1. Old males vital to elephant societies  EurekAlert
  2. Secrets of male elephant society revealed in the wild  BBC News
  3. Once seen as loners, male elephants shown to follow elders  NBCNews.com
  4. Hunters' excuse for killing old elephants dismissed as load of bull  The Times
  5. Old elephants hunted for ivory are vital leaders in elephant societies  Daily Mail
  6. View Full coverage on Google News
Old male elephants play a key role in leading all-male groups, new research suggests.Old male elephants play a key role in leading all-male groups, new research suggests.

Old males vital to elephant societies | EurekAlert! Science News

Mature male elephants play a crucial role in passing on their knowledge to younger males, a study suggests.Mature male elephants play a crucial role in passing on their knowledge to younger males, a study suggests.

Secrets of male elephant society revealed in the wild - BBC News

A new study shows that teenage males aren’t anti-social after all. Younger male elephants were seen tagging along behind older males as they travel.A new study shows that teenage males aren’t anti-social after all. Younger male elephants were seen tagging along behind older males as they travel.

Once seen as loners, male elephants shown to follow elders

The oldest bull elephants on the African savannah should be given new protections because they play a critical but hitherto unrecognised role in mentoring younger males, a study suggests.Veteran bullsThe oldest bull elephants on the African savannah should be given new protections because they play a critical but hitherto unrecognised role in mentoring younger males, a study suggests.Veteran bulls

UK research rubbishes claims by ivory dealers that old males are worth killing for their precious tusks on the grounds they are 'redundant' in terms of breeding and species survival.UK research rubbishes claims by ivory dealers that old males are worth killing for their precious tusks on the grounds they are 'redundant' in terms of breeding and species survival.

Old elephants hunted for ivory are vital leaders in elephant societies, study claims | Daily Mail Online

Researchers from the University of Exeter carried out the study.Researchers from the University of Exeter carried out the study.

Oldest elephants tend to lead all-male groups, study suggests | Irvine Times

Female elephants are known to form tight family groups led by experienced matriarchs. Males were long assumed to be loners, because they leave their mother’s herd when they reach 10 to 20 years of age. A new study shows that teenage males aren’t anti-social after all.Female elephants are known to form tight family groups led by experienced matriarchs. Males were long assumed to be loners, because they leave their mother’s herd when they reach 10 to 20 years of age. A new study shows that teenage males aren’t anti-social after all.

Loners no more: Male elephants stick together - sex and relationships - Hindustan Times