1. US researchers produce startling images of coronavirus-infected cells  The Times of Israel
  2. COVID-19 may one day come and go like the flu, but we're not there yet  Popular Science
  3. T cells take the lead in controlling SARS-CoV-2 and reducing COVID-19 disease severity  Medical Xpress
  4. Coronavirus immunity may not last more than 12 months, study finds  Salon
  5. COVID-19 Virus Survives on Chicken, Salmon, and Pork for 21 Days, Report Finds  VegNews
  6. View Full coverage on Google News
Pictures from UNC School of Medicine illustrate the density of SARS-CoV-2 on human tissue, which contributes to its spread within individuals, and to othersPictures from UNC School of Medicine illustrate the density of SARS-CoV-2 on human tissue, which contributes to its spread within individuals, and to others

US researchers produce startling images of coronavirus-infected cells | The Times of Israel

As more people recover from COVID-19, variables like temperature and humidity may have a larger impact on the spread of the virus.As more people recover from COVID-19, variables like temperature and humidity may have a larger impact on the spread of the virus.

COVID-19 may one day come and go like the flu, but we’re not there yet | Popular Science

Ever since SARS-CoV-2 first appeared, researchers have been trying to understand whether sometimes the immune system does more harm than good during the acute phase of COVID-19. The latest study by researchers ...

T cells take the lead in controlling SARS-CoV-2 and reducing COVID-19 disease severity

A recent analysis of antibody responses in Covid-19 patients may help to inform decisions into antibody-based intervention and vaccine design. A recent analysis of antibody responses in Covid-19 patients may help to inform decisions into antibody-based intervention and vaccine design.

Antibody responses in Covid-19 patients: What latest study reveals | Health24

“Recent outbreaks have emerged in Vietnam, New Zealand, and parts of China where there had been no cases for some months … importation of contaminated food and food packaging is a feasible source for such outbreaks,” researchers in Ireland and Singapore warn in a new preliminary report. “Recent outbreaks have emerged in Vietnam, New Zealand, and parts of China where there had been no cases for some months … importation of contaminated food and food packaging is a feasible source for such outbreaks,” researchers in Ireland and Singapore warn in a new preliminary report. 

COVID-19 Virus Survives on Chicken, Salmon, and Pork for 21 Days, Report Finds | VegNews

Multiple arms of secondary immune response need to respond in sync to coronavirusMultiple arms of secondary immune response need to respond in sync to coronavirus

An ‘uncoordinated’ immune response may explain why COVID-19 strikes some hard, particularly the elderly | Science | AAAS

A group of scientists studied protective immunity to similar coronaviruses and reached troubling conclusionsA group of scientists studied protective immunity to similar coronaviruses and reached troubling conclusions

Coronavirus immunity may not last more than 12 months, study finds | Salon.com

The research, which was published this week in the peer-reviewed journal 'Cell,' could explain why older people often experience more deadly coronavirus cases. The research, which was published this week in the peer-reviewed journal 'Cell,' could explain why older people often experience more deadly coronavirus cases.

San Diego Scientists Uncover Why Elderly COVID-19 Patients May Experience Deadlier Cases | KPBS

Scientists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have isolated “the smallest biological molecule” that “completely and specifically neutralizes” SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.Scientists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have isolated “the smallest biological molecule” that “completely and specifically neutralizes” SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Dr. Shashi Gujar, with the department of pathology at Dal, along with colleagues in the United States, Denmark, France, Germany, and India, is studying if the immune response against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, could be repurposed to fight cancer using the immune system, according to a news release on the Dalhousie University website.Dr. Shashi Gujar, with the department of pathology at Dal, along with colleagues in the United States, Denmark, France, Germany, and India, is studying if the immune response against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, could be repurposed to fight cancer using the immune system, according to a news release on the Dalhousie University website.

A new review published in Frontiers in Public Health suggests that COVID-19, the illness caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, will likely become seasonal in countries with temperate climates, but only when herd immunity is attained. Until that time, COVID-19 will continue to circulate across the seasons. These conclusions highlight the absolute importance of public health measures needed just now to control the virus.A new review published in Frontiers in Public Health suggests that COVID-19, the illness caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, will likely become seasonal in countries with temperate climates, but only when herd immunity is attained. Until that time, COVID-19 will continue to circulate across the seasons. These conclusions highlight the absolute importance of public health measures needed just now to control the virus.

Scientists predict that COVID-19 will become a seasonal virus - but not yet | News - Times of India Videos

A key carbohydrate molecule that the novel coronavirus uses to infect human cells has been discovered by researchers. The finding of the carbohydrate molecule may prove useful to treat and prevent Covid-19, the deadly disease caused by the new coronavirus.A key carbohydrate molecule that the novel coronavirus uses to infect human cells has been discovered by researchers. The finding of the carbohydrate molecule may prove useful to treat and prevent Covid-19, the deadly disease caused by the new coronavirus.

Scientists identify carbohydrate used by coronavirus to infect cells, finding may help prevent Covid-19 - SCIENCE News

The study, published in the journal Cell, found that SARS-CoV-2 can't grab onto ACE2 without heparan sulphate, which is also found on lung cell surfaces and acts as a co-receptor for viral entry.The study, published in the journal Cell, found that SARS-CoV-2 can't grab onto ACE2 without heparan sulphate, which is also found on lung cell surfaces and acts as a co-receptor for viral entry.

Carbohydrate that novel coronavirus uses to infect cells identified | coronavirus outbreak News,The Indian Express

The study, published in the journal Cell, found that SARS-CoV-2 can't grab onto ACE2 without heparan sulphate, which is also found on lung cell surfaces and acts as a co-receptor for viral entry.The study, published in the journal Cell, found that SARS-CoV-2 can't grab onto ACE2 without heparan sulphate, which is also found on lung cell surfaces and acts as a co-receptor for viral entry.

Carbohydrate that novel coronavirus uses to infect cells identified | coronavirus outbreak News,The Indian Express

It takes a unified front to ward off the coronavirus, and that gets harder with ageIt takes a unified front to ward off the coronavirus, and that gets harder with age

Your immune system fights COVID-19 best when it fights together, La Jolla Immunology scientists report - The San Diego Union-Tribune

Scientists have identified a key carbohydrate molecule, called heparan sulphate, which the novel coronavirus uses to infect human cells, an advance that may provide a potential new approach for preventing and treating Covid-19. The molecule ACE2 sits like a doorknob on the outer surfaces of the cells that line the lungs, and researchers know that SARS-CoV-2 virus primarilyScientists have identified a key carbohydrate molecule, called heparan sulphate, which the novel coronavirus uses to infect human cells, an advance that may provide a potential new approach for

Carbohydrate that novel coronavirus uses to infect cells, identified | Deccan Herald